Exhibits

  • Pique, 2014, multi-plate intaglio on oiled Japanese paper, 20” x 20”
  • Decipher, 2014, multi-plate intaglio on oiled Japanese paper, 20” x 20”
  • Mostly Here, 2014, multi-plate intaglio on oiled Japanese paper, 20” x 20”
  • Diminuendo, 2014, piano scrolls and boxes (some altered with intaglio prints, woodcut monoprints and hand painting, dimensions variable) (and detail)
  • Diminuendo, 2014, piano scrolls and boxes (some altered with intaglio prints, woodcut monoprints and hand painting, dimensions variable) (and detail)

High Strung

Mixed Media by Randy Garber

October 6 - November 6

Reception: Thursday, October 16, 5-7 pm

BOSTON (September 8, 2014) — Simmons College presents High Strung, a mixed media installation of work by Randy Garber, from October 6—November 6 at the Trustman Art Gallery, located on the fourth floor, Main College Building, 300 the Fenway in Boston. A reception from 5-7 p.m. will be held on Thursday, October 16. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public.

Randy Garber’s work is complex; an interplay between visuals that call to mind sound and memory.  She uses both signs and words as signifiers of meaning—they overlap enthusiastically, senselessly tumble from the wall and meander slowly across our field of view. 

Randy Garber’s multi-layered site-specific installation in the gallery expertly intertwines prints and sculptural elements. Her materials of paper and copper play different roles to intrigue us to think about how we process information and what we think we know as true. In Garber’s installation, the player piano rolls, cochlear satellites and layered prints are staccato exclamations of unheard sound. They aren’t linear or ordered, yet they pull us towards a fractured narrative.

In High Strung, created specifically for this exhibit, high on the wall we see emerging from a copper tubing vortex a fall of paper cording that puddles chaotically on the floor. Cords and its homonym, chords, are suggested because much of the paper is musical notation. What tune is referenced, what harmonies or discords are sounding?  The work calls upon us to construct meaning, to verify for ourselves that we understand her leap of imagination.  Randy Garber’s work makes us aware of our constructed and shifting comprehension.

Our Lunchtime Lecture Series continues in the Gallery on October 28 at 12:30 p.m. with Professor Gary Bailey from the School of Social Work. His talk, Art: Looking Through the Keyhole at Human Rights and Social Justice will be followed by discussion.

Trustman Gallery hours are 10 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. The Gallery is free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Marcia Lomedico at 617-521-2268.

 

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